Category Archives: Best Practices

Index and Search In-Place Workflows Key to Reducing eDiscovery Costs and Risks

By John Patzakis

Most core eDiscovery costs (outside of attorney review) stem from over-collection of electronically stored information (ESI). While direct collection costs can seem inexpensive, law firm Nelson Mullins notes that “over preservation tends to have its own costs relating to storage of large amounts of electronically stored information (ESI) and the resources needed to manage it; leads to increased downstream e-discovery costs associated with collection, processing, and review.”

Traditional eDiscovery workflows typically involve broad and manual collection efforts, followed by on-premise hardware-based processing, and finally upload to review. These inefficiencies extend projects by often weeks while dramatically increasing cost and risk with bloated data volumes and many manual data handoffs.

Proportionality-based eDiscovery is a goal that all judges and corporate attorneys want to attain. Under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 26(b)(1), parties may discover any non-privileged material that is relevant to any party’s claim or defense and proportional to the needs of the case. However, attorneys representing enterprises are essentially flying blind on this analysis when it matters most. Prior to the custodian data being actually collected, processed and analyzed, attorneys do not have any real visibility into the potentially relevant ESI across an organization. This is especially true in regard to unstructured, distributed data, which is invariably the majority of ESI that is ultimately collected in a given matter.

If accurate pre-collection data insight were available to counsel, that game-changing factor would enable counsel to set reasonable discovery limits and ultimately process, host, review and produce much less ESI. Counsel can further use pre-collection proportionality analysis to gather key information, develop a litigation budget, and better manage litigation deadlines. Such insights can also foster cooperation by informing the parties early in the process about where relevant ESI is located, and what keywords and other search parameters can identify and pinpoint relevant ESI.

A solution to these challenges is the utilization of index and search in-place technology. Indexing and search in-place in this context means that a software-based indexing technology is deployed directly onto file servers, laptops or even in the cloud to address cloud-based data sources. This indexing occurs without a bulk data transfer of the data. Once indexed, the searches are performed in a few seconds, with complex Boolean operators, metadata filters and regular expression searches. The searches can be iterated and repeated without limitation, which is critical for large data sets.

Mandi Ross, CEO at Insight Optix explained how she applies proportionality when advising lawyers and judges through custodian interviews, coupled with detailed keyword search term analysis based upon the matter’s specific claims and defenses. She noted that technology such as X1 greatly enables the application of her practice in real time: “The ability to index in place is a game-changer because we have the ability to gain insight into the data and validate custodian interview data without first requiring that data to be collected.”

But it is important that the technology employed truly enables index-in-place, with the indexes deployed directly onto the laptops, file shares or cloud servers where the data exists. Some providers will market their tools as such, but the indexing and searching actually takes place in their platform at a central location. Data must first be copied and collected off of laptops and file servers and migrated over the network to get the indexing engines.  This does not scale for eDiscovery. For information about X1’s index-in-place technology, X1 Enterprise Platform, please visit us here.  

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Filed under Best Practices, eDiscovery, Enterprise eDiscovery, ESI, Preservation & Collection, proportionality

eDiscovery Services Are Undergoing a Major Transformation

By John Patzakis

Recent research from industry analyst Greg Buckles at the eDiscovery Journal highlights soaring valuations for eDiscovery tech firms.  For the first time in the history of the industry, multiple eDiscovery tech firms have gone public in a single year, and by my count, there are at least seven tech “Unicorns” (a company with at least a billion dollar valuation) in the space. Relativity leads the way with at least a $3.6 billion valuation based upon their latest financing.

Yet while technology-based providers are seeing escalating valuations, valuations and M&A activity for pure services firms are conversely softening. This is because tech automation is finally catching up to this space. Traditional eDiscovery services typically involve manual collection, followed by manual on-premise hardware-based processing, and finally manual upload to review. These inefficiencies extend projects by often weeks while dramatically increasing cost and risk with many manual data handoffs. However, the first half of the EDRM involving collection and processing are now far more automated than they were even a few years ago. For instance, the one aspect of eDiscovery tech that is actually seeing decreasing usage and revenues are standalone processing appliances. This is because these tools are dependent upon the efficient manual services model prior to ingestion and also post import.

However, the latest in eDiscovery collection technologies will now combine targeted collection with previously manual processing steps that are performed “on the fly” and in the background so that the data is automatically collected, processed and uploaded into a review platform such as Relativity in one fell swoop. Better yet, processing is now free with RelativityOne. The automation Relativity is engineering, including with their integration with X1, along with innovations by other review platforms, is rendering traditional eDiscovery processing tech obsolete, along with manual collection and processing services. The purchasers of eDiscovery services and software have clearly noticed and are demanding adaptation from vendors.  

So how can services firms adapt to the inevitable? Here are few strategies:

First, services firms should move upstream to focus on information governance and privacy consulting. The new generation of eDiscovery technology enables convergence with privacy (i.e. GDPR compliance) information security and many other information governance use cases. This convergence requires high-end strategic consulting to bring these processes together and operationalize them. This also enables services firms to develop direct and ongoing relationships with corporate law departments, IT and other key corporate stakeholders.

Second, data analytics consulting, which is already a prominent offering by many firms, is ripe for further expansion. This is because analytics for eDiscovery is becoming more advanced and user friendly, and thus is able to be applied across the eDiscovery workflow, including pre-collection analytics and information governance.

Third, services firms should find ways to develop or otherwise acquire their own differentiating tech or establish meaningful partnerships with tech platform providers. These partnerships should entail more than merely using the software, but the development of proprietary workflows or even technical integrations that enable unique service offerings.

At the end of the day, eDiscovery is a technical process that is subject to technology disruption just like any other technology-based services industry. eDiscovery services firms that not only adapt to but embrace this change as a strategic opportunity will be the ones who prosper the most.

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Filed under Best Practices, eDiscovery, eDiscovery & Compliance, GDPR, Information Governance, Preservation & Collection, Uncategorized