90 Percent of Law Firms Managed Social Media Evidence Collections in 2018

By John Patzakis

The International Legal Technology Association recently published a very informative and comprehensive law firm eDiscovery practice survey “2018 Litigation and Practice Support Survey.” ILTA received responses from 181 different law firms — small, medium and large — on a variety of subjects, including eDiscovery practice trends and software tool usage.  The survey reveals three key takeaways regarding social media and website discovery.

The first clear takeaway is that social media discovery is clearly increasing among law firms and in the field in general. 90 percent of responding law firms reported conducting social media discovery in 2018. Additionally, the responding firms reported a higher average volume of cases involving social media evidence, with a 46 percent increase in firms handling at least 20 matters per year involving social media evidence.

ILTA Survey v2

Source: ILTA 2018 Litigation and Practice Support Survey

In terms of identified software solution usage, the survey establishes that X1 Social Discovery is the clear leader in the web and social media capture category among purpose-built tools used by law firms. 63 percent of all surveyed law firms rely on X1 Social Discovery on either an in-sourced or outsourced basis. This is consistent with our own internal data, reflecting the industry’s standardization of social media evidence collection by the sheer volume of customers that have adopted X1 Social Discovery. Nearly 200 law firms and 400 eDiscovery services firms have at least one paid license of X1 Social Discovery.

And in addition to social media evidence collections, X1 Social Discovery registered as the most popular eDiscovery software used for webmail collection (i.e. Gmail, Yahoo, Aol, Office 365) with 32 percent of law firms relying on X1 for this purposes. X1 Social Discovery provides an extremely effective means to collect, search, tag, and export via loadfile or pst web-based email evidence.

The final takeaway is that the practice of using screen captures with general IT tools like Adobe and Snagit is still commonly employed by practitioners at law firms, but is virtually non-existent amongst service providers, who typically are on the forefront of adapting best practices. Screen capturing is neither effective nor defensible.  They are ineffective because the results are very narrow and incomplete, and the process is very labor intensive resulting in much higher costs to the client than using best practices. (See Stallings v. City of Johnston, 2014 WL 2061669 (S.D. Ill. May 19, 2014): the law firm spent a full week screen capturing contents of a Facebook account — which amounted to over 500 printed pages — manually rearranging them, and then redacting at a cost of tens of thousands of dollars).

In addition, simple screen captures are not defensible, with several courts disallowing or otherwise calling into question social media evidence presented in the form of a screen shot image. This scrutiny will only increase with Federal Rule of Evidence 902(14) now in effect. I have previously addressed Rule 902(14) at length on this blog, but in a nutshell, screen captures are not Rule 902(14) compliant, while best practices technology like X1 Social Discovery have the critical ability to collect all available metadata and generate an MD5 checksum, or “hash value,” of the preserved data for verification of the integrity of the evidence. The generation of hash values is a key component for meeting the requirements of FRE 902(14).

The ILTA Litigation Practice survey results can be accessed here. For more information about how to conduct effective social medial investigations, please contact us, or request a free demo version of X1 Social Discovery.

 

1 Comment

Filed under Best Practices, Case Law, eDiscovery, Social Media Investigations, Uncategorized

One response to “90 Percent of Law Firms Managed Social Media Evidence Collections in 2018

  1. Pingback: Week 18 – 2019 – This Week In 4n6

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